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HOT & COLD THERAPY - WET AREA

WET AREA
DAILY PASS

$7.50 / One Off

NO GYM ACCESS

UNLIMITED ACCESS TO HOT & COLD THERAPY:

SAUNA

ICE BATH

HOT SPA

MASSAGE BATH

STEAM AND JETS SHOWER

 SERVICE HOURS:

– MONDAY TO FRIDAY: 8AM-8PM

– SATURDAYS: 8AM-5PM

– SUNDAYS: CLOSED.

– ALL PUBLIC HOLIDAYS: CLOSE FOR MAINTENANCE

 

WET AREA
WEEKLY PASS

$9.99 / Week

NO GYM ACCESS

UNLIMITED ACCESS TO HOT & COLD THERAPY:

SAUNA

ICE BATH

HOT SPA

MASSAGE BATH

STEAM AND JETS SHOWER

 3 MONTH CONTRACT

 SERVICE HOURS:

– MONDAY TO FRIDAY: 8AM-8PM

– SATURDAYS: 8AM-5PM

– SUNDAYS: CLOSED

– ALL PUBLIC HOLIDAYS: CLOSE FOR MAINTENANCE

 

BENEFITS OF ICE BATH

Lift your mood and mental state:

Ice baths naturally create balance and increase the levels of neurotransmitters like norepinephrine and feel-good serotonin. Cold water immersion can trigger a floodgate of mood-enhancing chemicals in the brain by awaking a natural ‘fight-or-flight’ response. This response to ‘environmental stress’ conditions our brain to cope better with the stressors of everyday life and helps decrease the production of inflammatory cytokines which are linked to anxiety and depression. By exposing your body to colder temperatures, you’re able to build up a higher tolerance to stress.

Enjoy a good night’s sleep:

More than 80% of athletes taking post exercise ice baths report improved mental state and far better sleep patterns. Rest habits are triggered and regulated by the brain and the nervous system and ice bath therapy has been shown to have a direct effect on both. After the initial cold water temperature shock, your body is able to calm down and becomes more resilient to changes in our environment. This translate into you building up a higher tolerance to stress by regulating your cortisol levels helping improve the symptoms of depression and reducing the instance of sleep-related disorders.

Drive your body further:

By exposing your body to colder temperatures, you’re able to alter the behaviour of your fat cells. With an exposure to physiological stressors, the ice bath method challenges your body to function beyond its comfort zone, hence its direct effect on immune function. Not only that, but the body sets off a response to the nervous system affecting oxygen intake, which helps deliver an increase in energy. Cold water immersions have been shown to trigger ‘recruiting’ which means your body can take white fat cells and turn them into brown fat cells. Unlike the tissue in white fat cells, the tissue in brown fat cells converts energy into heat. It’s a process called thermogenesis, and it’s been shown to help with metabolic function, blood glucose levels, and the prevention of weight gain. Doing ice baths over time may help your body transform from the inside-out, with more of fat cells that burn energy to generate heat and less fat cells that store energy to be released as a back up in case your body needs it. Just imagine your body helping you maintain weight for a change instead of working against you!

Reach beyond your limits:

Shift your system into gear with cold water therapy by challenging your body to function beyond its comfort zone.

How ice bath therapy works:

  • During a training session, your muscles burn fuel and that creates a build-up of toxic waste products and lactic acids. Your body will naturally eliminate these waste products over a day or two however ice baths can reduce this recovery time to hours.
  • By immersing your body in chilled water, the sudden cold sets off a reaction in the limbic (ancient) area in the base of your brain that is programmed to respond to such dramatic external events, in this case it senses that you might be freezing dangerously. This is also called the ‘fight-or-flight’ response.
  • An automatic process begins to restore your body’s core temperature to safe levels by increasing blood flow and withdrawing most of the blood from your skin and outer soft tissue and muscles into the core of your body via your internal organs. This introduces fresh oxygenated blood and flushes the dangerous toxins and waste products quickly & effectively, much faster than the natural process. This eliminates the soreness related to exercise and speeds up your muscle recovery process.
  • This response to ‘environmental stress’ conditions our brain to cope better with the stressors of everyday life and helps decrease the production of inflammatory cytokines which are linked to anxiety and depression. Most athletes report higher moods and better sleep after an ice bath.

BENEFITS OF SAUNA

Relieves Sore Muscles

Saunas are a common feature in gyms because people think sitting in a sauna after a workout helps relieve sore muscles. There is evidence this long-held belief is indeed true. Saunas are hot, and the high heat encourages increased blood circulation to the skin, and therefore to the muscles, as well. After a workout, muscles flood with lactic acid, a natural result of use. However, the acid causes soreness. Increased blood flow can more quickly ease the aches and pain caused by the lactic acid faster than at room temperature.

Clears the Skin

Besides bodybuilders and those who frequent the gym, saunas are a popular choice for people with skin conditions. Spending time in a sauna can make the skin feel cleaner, and there is evidence the steam in a wet sauna is more effective than washing the face at clearing blemishes. Wet saunas are steamy, hot rooms. The heat makes skin sweat and opens pores. The water in the air then helps bacteria within the skin flow away from the body. If skin blemishes are due to hormones or medications, however, saunas may be less effective in this regard.

Expels Toxins from the Body

Nearly every site discussing the benefits of saunas repeats the claim that saunas help the body expel toxins. Because of this claim, people sit in a hot sauna when they are ill with a cold or feeling hungover, believing the heat will discharge toxic chemicals and make them feel better. This is not entirely true. The truth is, the liver processes toxins, and seldom needs extra help. Spending time in a sauna can make you dehydrated due to increased sweating, and dehydration can slow the work of the liver. People with colds or hangovers will do better with bed rest and lots of water than time in a sauna.

Helps Weight Loss

Long term weight loss comes predominantly from burning more calories than consumed and boosting time or effort in exercising. That said, many people notice that sitting in a sauna helps with this goal, as well. The weight lost in a sauna is all water weight, however. While the heat of a sauna increases metabolism and burn more calories than sitting stationary at room temperature, the number of extra calories burned is comparatively quite small, and is unlikely to affect permanent weight loss.

Reduces Blood Pressure

High blood pressure or hypertension can be dangerous; blood pressure remaining too high for a long time puts a strain on the heart muscle, increasing the risk of a stroke or heart attack. When doctors prescribe treatment to patients with high blood pressure, they often recommend drugs like statins to reduce blood pressure, and may also suggest regular sauna use because heat improves the function and flexibility of blood vessels. As with any changes to treatment, it is best to confirm this option with a doctor rather than undertaking sauna use without medical advice.

Helps Chronic Pain

People with chronic pain have used saunas to alleviate their condition since Roman times, largely due to the relaxing environment. Today, patients with conditions such as fibromyalgia use heat treatment to manage their pain without prescription drugs. While saunas reduce pain for a time, any form of heat, including a hot bath, will have the same effect. People with mobility issues may find saunas easier than tubs to enter and exit.

Increases Tolerance to Exercise

Saunas are a great benefit to athletes and people looking to boost their endurance. For years, coaches in Europe have encouraged their athletes to use a sauna after training, particularly for cross country skiers. Scientists now know the reason for these benefits. The heat and mild dehydration the body experiences in a sauna triggers the release of the hormone erythropoietin or EPO, which encourages the body to create more blood cells. These blood cells can carry more oxygen to muscles when exercising, enabling people to use their muscles longer and harder.

Helps Manage Stress

Anyone experiencing excess stress, depression, or anxiety should speak to a medical professional, who may prescribe medicine or therapy. For everyday stress, which everyone feels at times, the relaxing benefits of a sauna can be helpful as one method of reducing stress. Studies show saunas help reduce levels of the hormone cortisol, which jumpstarts the fight or flight response, resulting — in this day and age — in high stress. Saunas provide time away from the hustle of a busy life and give the mind time to relax and recharge. Research suggests infrared saunas are particularly beneficial in this regard.

Helps Fight Illness

Saunas may not be a suitable treatment for colds or hangovers, but what about other illnesses? While saunas might help manage symptoms, there is little evidence that they can cure disease or speed recovery for most people, with the possible exception of respiratory conditions. A sauna will not speed recovery from any virus, but the heat and humidity could kill bacteria. Because sinus infections are often caused by a bacterial infection, and because the hot steam of a sauna is breathed in, time in the sauna could shorten the length of such illnesses.

Social Health Benefits

Finally, time in a sauna has health benefits because it is often a social activity. Although time spent alone is good for mental health, social interaction has a lot of pros, too. The first saunas in Ancient Rome were communal, and many countries today including Japan, Norway, Turkey, and Sweden, emphasize the social healing power of saunas. Relaxing with other people stimulates our bodies to release feel-good hormones, endorphins, which have many proven health benefits.

WET AREA
DAILY PASS

$7.50 / One Off

WET AREA
WEEKLY PASS

$9.99 / Week